Kim Kardashian Releases New Sex Tape! (The Problem with Clickbait)

This blog isn’t about Kimye. Cue either relief or disappointment (but if you really need your Kardashian fix, check out Hollywood Life).

Here’s the thing about clickbait: You kind of need to do it, because otherwise even the best content won’t get as many clicks, as much exposure, or as many shares. That being said, there’s a big gray area when it comes to clickbait. There’s sensationalism, and then there’s marketing standard highlighting. Obviously if you choose a title like, “Kim Kardashian Releases New Sex Tape” and the content is jibberish, a sales pitch for a hair transplant company, or features a clip of Kim K. talking about her efforts to get pregnant again in her new season, you’re not just committing libel. You’re also seriously taking “clickbait” too far.

Let Kim live!  She may be a clickbait lover's top prize, but remember: Anything worth having, like quality content or SEO rankings, isn't easy). (Photo: HATE online media).
Let Kim live! She may be a clickbait lover’s top prize, but remember: Anything worth having, like quality content or SEO rankings, isn’t easy. (Photo: HATE online media).

It’s a catch-22 because your clients (and your SEO rankings) want your headlines to draw people in. Unfortunately, in an era where news is reported in real-time and the idea of breaking a story has pretty much died, how can you come out on top? Yes, you need a catchy headline with SEO elements, but what else? Getting someone to click on a link is just part of the process. If you’re offering up offensive clickbait, you’re also going to get a slew of bouncebacks. Ultimately, your SEO won’t improve from such a shortcut.

Walking the Line

Writing great headlines and titles have a lot of “rules” or best practices. You want it short and sweet enough that it won’t get cropped in search results (both on major search engines and on whatever website the story is being hosted on). For awhile people loved lists, even dubbing them listicles. Now a lot of people hate them, so you have a 50/50 split. You also need to create or curate images that are high quality, have SEO elements themselves, and won’t get you into trouble (copyright infringement, anyone?).

Unfortunately for those looking for a shortcut, they simply don’t exist. You might experience short term gains with clickbait and other gray hat tricks (since some clickbait strategies aren’t quite blackhat), but it won’t last forever.

Plus, the average content consumer is getting savvier with clickbait, and they know how to identify it and what it’s called. If you get “caught” by one viewer, your credibility and reputation may get marred. Leave the hyperbole to your fiction pieces. It’s a world where news happens and is reported nearly simultaneously, so it’s not a race to be first or the most outlandish. It’s a competition to see who can offer the best, most thorough, fact checked, edited content with (legal) complementary images.

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5 Truths about Working from Home (or Wherever)

Working from home, in Costa Rica circa 2011, in the backyard hammock.
Working from home, in Costa Rica circa 2011, in the backyard hammock.

Working from home and running your own business is worlds away from being allowed to telecommute as a permanent employee. There are a lot of myths about it, rumors swirling, and envious glances when you can make that 10am spin class that nobody else can swing. Is it a dream come true? When I think back to my own days of the daily grind as a worker bee, definitely. I haven’t worn slacks, a suit, or hosiery in years. However, that doesn’t mean working from the couch is always glitters and unicorns, either.

Of course, every small business owner, entrepreneur, and telecommuter will have a different experience. Here are a few of my daily realities—for better or worse:

  1. The whole yoga pants/work on the couch thing is true

I actually do work from a couch (sorry, ergonomics) in yoga pants most days. In my defense, I’m also a certified yoga teacher and practice on a regular basis. I just don’t get into the whole home office thing. Working from a desk and in an “office chair” just makes it feel too much like I’m working for someone else. Perhaps it was all those years of conditioning that turned me off “an office” for good.

  1. There’s no such thing as an alarm

The only time I set an alarm is when I have an early morning flight. Otherwise, I’m naturally a morning person, complete with pepperings of insomnia from time to time. My work day usually starts between 5 and 6am and ends around 4 or 5pm.

  1. Yes, the TV’s on

However, it’s on mute and it’s more for “company” than anything else. Seeing flickers of people and colors peripherally keeps me out of tunnel vision. Plus, I know I should be done with Client X’s work of the day by the time Frasier segues to How I Met Your Mother. And if I don’t have Client Y’x stuff done by the time Grey’s Anatomy is over? I’ll be pulling double duty that day.

  1. There’s no such thing as leaving work at the office

Even if I had an actual office, this wouldn’t be the case. I have clients around the world. My contact in Thailand regularly sends me requests during her normal work hours, which is the middle of the night for me. When you have a backlog of requests nagging at you on a weekend and you have some down time, it’s easy to think you’re “getting ahead” by squeezing in just a few more articles. In three weeks, I’ll be taking three weeks off (forced without Wi-Fi thanks to rural India). It will be the first time I don’t work for more than one day, consecutively, in five years.

  1. I set my own schedule (for the most part)

Of course there are deadlines, but here’s the thing: Writers are notoriously flaky (I know, I’ve gone through a laundry list when hiring them myself). That means clients often give me way more time than necessary. Thus, I work when I like, can take any gym class I want, shop in the middle of a weekday, and never have an issue squeezing in appointments.

In the end, there are pros and cons just like any work situation. I don’t miss the commute, the “having” to get ready every day, or the staring contest with the clock when you’re working by the hour. However, the work from home lifestyle isn’t “easy”, either—luckily for me, I just happen to be cut out for it. It’s about finding the best environment, career path, and work style for you (and if yoga pants fit into the picture, that’s all the better).

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Bartering: The Writer’s Secret Tool

A fair "trade": Offering a cheetah her dinner in exchange for a fantastic experience. (Photo by Chintan Mehta at the Wildlife Safari in Winston, Ore.).
A fair “trade”: Offering a cheetah her dinner in exchange for a fantastic experience. (Photo by Chintan Mehta at the Wildlife Safari in Winston, Ore.).

There was a time I paid for everything for my professional site—web development, logo design, professional photos, you name it. I’m not saying that there aren’t fantastic professionals out there who more than deserve their quotes and bids for a job well done. There certainly are, and they certainly do. However, don’t overlook a great barter arrangement when you can swing it.

Bartering: It’s the world’s oldest means of getting and providing services. However, you need to make sure it’s a fair trade. Almost everyone has a marketable skill that someone else wants. Maybe you’re a certified yoga instructor, a contractor, an SEO guru or an amateur photographer with serious skills. What happens when you want a service from a professional outside your skill set? This is the perfect opportunity for bartering.

My Bartering Experience

One year ago, I paid (handsomely) to have a new logo created. I did my research, checked out her online portfolio, and paid the industry standard. However, the end result just wasn’t what I wanted. I’m no graphic designer, so perhaps much of this was my fault. Even as a communicator (writer) for a living, was I just not explaining what I wanted? I didn’t have a specific “look” in mind, but I was open and descriptive in the general theme and look.

However, the end result (to me) just looked amateur, outdated, and not at all how I wanted to represent my business. I accepted it, paid it, and felt like I was playing dress up in someone else’s clothes.

Then I stumbled across a Craigslist post to barter landing page content for graphic design skills.

Just the Right Fit

The logo that I use today (complete with the pen in the “M” of MehtaFor) was designed by Lisa Lynch. You can check out her graphic design chops yourself, as well as her jewelry design. There was never any money exchanged. We both got what we wanted, it was a money saver for both parties—and for me it was proof that bartering isn’t a cheapskate’s way of making something happen.

No matter what your industry, take a look at bartering options and see what’s out there. However, for writers in particular, you already know your skills are in high demand. Why not swap a blog for a massage session, some product descriptions for some free handcrafted goods, or landing page content for complimentary mechanical work?

So You’re a Writer…What’s Your Real Job?

Do your passion, even when others think it's foolish. (Photo: Personal, by Chintan Mehta from An Elefabulous Evening at Wildlife Safari, Winston, Ore.).
Do your passion, even when others think it’s foolish. (Photo: Personal, by Chintan Mehta from An Elefabulous Evening at Wildlife Safari, Winston, Ore.).

Contrary to popular belief, you really can write for a living without the need of a second job, part-time job, inheritance or wealthy love interest. I know because I’m doing it, but there’s still a big, stinky stigma around writers as professionals. Plus, I also boast a lot of cliches myself. Yes, I got my undergrad degree in English (making it even better by specializing in British Medieval Literature, and then going on for a master’s degree in writing). Yes, I love to read, I consider myself a “creative type” and I’ve published books through a traditional trade press. However, that’s largely where the stereotypes end.

Before founding MehtaFor and writing (much more!) than full time, I worked for a variety of non-profits for eight years. My titles ranged from Director of Alumni Relations to Director of Event Coordination. It basically meant I was writing press releases, grant proposals, RFPs, website content, brochures and everything else you can imagine. I was a writer with a different title charged with a bunch of admin tasks to boot.

They weren’t horrible jobs, but it just wasn’t the right fit. Why couldn’t I make a living doing both what I love and what I was naturally good at? The better question was, “What the heck took me so long?”

Happy Accidents

I stumbled into entrepreneurship and then small business ownership (and then training others to do what I do) the way a lot of people get there: Getting laid off during the Great Recession. The department I was working for closed, and I had an opportunity to move to Costa Rica (where cost of living is much lower), so I grabbed it. En route, I picked up my first freelance writing gig from a Craigslist fluke.

A few years later, and plenty of hard lessons later, business has blossomed. Here’s what nobody tells English majors in college: Every single business, regardless of size, needs professional writing. Some businesses figure it out sooner than others. Especially in the digital era and the age of mobile readiness, this means writers who specialize in web content, search engine optimization (SEO), blogging, etc. are particularly in high demand.

Writing. It’s a recession-proof job with endless projects, clients and opportunities if you’re good, fast, and know where the best (for you) clients are.

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